Arts 

ROCKY HORROR HIPSTER SHOW

I wanna see lips.  (Photo by Emily Hopkins)

Next Saturday, the Full Body Cast will take its last gender bending lap around the AMC Loews in Harvard Square, where it has held weekly showings of The Rocky Horror Picture Show for 28 years.

The cast and crew are sad to say goodbye to what many called their “second home,” but they have no intentions of stopping the fun.

“We’ve moved before,” said Gary Greenbaum, who has been the Assistant Director for 18 years and is really, really nice.

When I heard that the theater was closing, I felt a small twitch of panic.  I’d been meaning to make it out to a Rocky Horror showing since moved to Boston, and now that it was ending, I felt that I’d lost my chance to experience part of the city.

So I did exactly the same thing as when I heard Harpers Ferry was closing before I’d gotten my ass out there: I bought a ticket to one of the final performances in the space.

This would be my first visit to a live showing of Rocky Horror, but I’ve been a fan from way back, from before I was old enough to understand cross-dressing or know about oral sex.  While growing up in a small town in upstate New York, I always felt like a bit of a freak, and discovering Rocky Horror was like a soothing pat on the back: you are not alone.  I even remember printing out a copy of the anti-script (the stuff Rocky Horror fans shout at the screen during the show) so that I could yell at my TV screen.

When I arrived at the AMC Loews on Saturday, though, I felt alone.  There was a line drawn down the middle of the street—audience members on one side, cast and crew on the other—and neither looked eager for me to approach it.

Rocky Horror is a colorful show, but the cast and crew were all dressed in black as they sucked on their cigarettes outside the Christian Science Reading Room, across from the theater.  A cast member recognizes that I’m from the press by the camera on my neck and my stenographer’s notebook, and he is nice enough to bring me over to introduce me to Gary.  I try to mingle amongst the cast, but no one is very interested in talking to me, which I kind of understand: I was in plays when I was in high school, and the last thing I’d want to do before a show—especially one of the last—would be to talk to an outsider.

I ask to take a photo of a gorgeous couple leaning against a lamppost, and although I identify myself as from the Dig, the word somehow gets lost between me and them.

“Is this for something, or is this just a picture?” says the man.  I tell him again that I’m from the Dig, and he seems angry.

“You should tell people that it’s for something.  I once agreed to a picture and ended up in the Metro.  The Dig is cool, but you should tell people.”

I don’t get to take any more pictures.  Gary finds me and tells me he’ll lead me inside before the audience so that I can get a good seat.  He says that I’ll be able to take photos of them setting up, but that once the movie starts, I should put my camera away.

Camera still slung around my neck, I dig in my pocket for my ticket while a couple ahead of me tries to get in early.

“We’re with the cast,” one says, but the Rocky Horror doorman is not having it.

“Who do you know?  I’ve been here 18 years and I’ve never seen you before,” says the doorman.  After some persuasion, the couple (who, as it turns out, performed in the show in the ’80s) convinces the doorman to let them in.  I flash my ticket, and Gary explains who I am, explains that I’m just going to sit out of the way while they set up.

An AMC lackey comes up from a few feet away and brusquely says, “No media are allowed in without AMC’s permission.”

The camera is always the problem, so I disassemble the flash to assure him that I’ll take no more photos inside the theater; I’m just here to watch.  He insists.

“There is an 800-number that you have to call.  No media are allowed in.”

Somehow, I am able to convince him that media are also people, people who buy tickets, like the one I bought and expected to be honored.  He lets me in, with one final grunt of, “I know I sound like an asshole, but I’m just telling you the rules.”

He was right: He did sound like an asshole.

After a frenzy of running and squealing, the simple set is assembled and the rest of the audience is let in.  It’s a mixed bag: Some in plain clothes, some in lingerie, many drunk, and one fabulous member named Wally, hailing from Chicago, whose Frank-N-Furter costume and make-up nearly outdo the actual cast.

Oh, Frank.

The show begins with a number of skits that put me much more at ease, and I feel for the first time like I am not alone.  Instead, I am a part of that sacred and temporary community that is an audience, born out of a silent agreement to stick (or sit) together through a performance.

The feeling is fleeting, however, as the screen flickers to life.  Pink’s “Raise Your Glass” starts to play, lip dubbed by the cast of the show running through Harvard Square.

While completely acknowledging the fact that I might just be a party pooper, I am totally put off by its plastic sheen and vapidity.

Things go better once the show starts—it’s as hilarious as I thought it would be, and I was put in a laughing fit by the rice that rained down during Brad and Janet’s proposal scene.  It’s a little hard to hear anything clearly; everyone in the audience is shouting their own version of the anti-script, and the result is what sounds like a busy bar.  A few clear sentences ring through every now and then (most notably from Wally’s guest, whose shouts are by far the funniest), but mostly it’s just sonic sludge, and I can’t decide if it’s the seasoned veterans or the shouts of “virgins” who have mistaken the tradition for casual heckling.

The show is still fun though, and it has energy, but my mental displacement is complete when the cast member playing Janet grabs my right breast as she runs down the aisle, vulgarly shouting, “Titty!” as she takes a squeeze.

I can hardly hear as I fight back that lump that forms in your throat right before you cry.

In my next few thoughts, my mind regresses to bouts of victim blaming—was it my fault for sitting on the aisle?  Should I have expected that kind of thing at a midnight showing of Rocky Horror?

No, of course not.  Because amongst all of the rules about not drinking or throwing things at the actors, on the website and during the preshow spiel, not once did someone say,

“The cast members may grope you during the performance, please switch places with someone a little more kinky if you aren’t into that.”

And it’s fine if you are, but I’m not, and going to a Rocky Horror show certainly shouldn’t say that I am for me.

The groping incident put aside, the whole night was full of a nostalgia that I and the “virgin” part of the audience were not privy to.  I wanted to be a part of the Harvard Square Rocky Horror experience, but it’s just not mine to have, and no amount of scrambling for tickets to the final performances will change that.  And I don’t think I want it to.  I might try the performance again when they move to the Boston Common theater (they’ll recommence performing in August), but I’ll never be as good as the guy who’s been there for 18 years and never seen me before, or the dude who is too good for the Metro, or anyone else who went to the shows back when they were at Harvard.

I hadn’t earned the right to feel the nostalgia that many in that theater probably felt, but I did feel the entitled pecking order that the cast, crew, and regulars imposed on the “virgins,” which made it feel less like we were all sharing in this great alternative cultural experience and more like we were being hazed—less of a “Welcome!” and more of a “Look at my fucking swagger!”  One of the audience members even mocked me for being a journalism student—and this was only her second time at the show!

Which is the brunt of it, isn’t it?  A bunch of kids grasping at the last dying breaths of an era, trying to legitimize their history by belittling those whose history is briefer than theirs.

What a bunch of fucking hipsters.

'

32 Responses to ROCKY HORROR HIPSTER SHOW

  1. Meredith Meredith says:

    Congratulations! You’ve attended a show where the theme of the film is “Give yourself over to absolute pleasure!” What was your research like before you went to this show as a journalist, clearly it was extensive. How does it feel to be the frigid bitch of the Weekly Dig, by the way which is one of the most liberal papers in Boston, that is FREE!

    You’ve come to an INTERACTIVE show where people pay to be groped, embarrassed, offended, and amused (with an R rating) by cast and other audience members. Though the FBC doesn’t intend to hurt anyone, we do put disclaimers frequently out there. We also announce to audience members that we are similar to a high class strip joint “we are allowed to touch you, you are not allowed to touch us!” We also like to point out that aisle seats are the “fun” seats, meaning: you will get touched. Also, if you come in the “appropriate” attire, which means women scantily dressed in nipple tape, and men in fishnets, and you’re on the aisle seat, you now have a guarantee of getting touched (it seems like you were falsely identified). Sorry we are not like the wholesome broadway show you thought we were, but please keep in mind the audience we attract.

    So sorry you had someone touch you sexually, and that it was a woman, which you clearly seem to not enjoy, but once again, the theme of the film clearly leans towards a more bisexual point of view, that is INTERACTIVE, and ONCE AGAIN with an R RATING!

    You came to the show clearly with a closed mind, and no previous information (which you can easily look up from past articles like the Globe that is reputable, our security team that announces exactly what to except and when, as well as past images & videos – so you can actually see what we do). Also, we make it very clear that we are always open to talk to any reporters with given notice or introducing yourself as press (please seek references with The Globe, The Boston Herald, The Crimson, The Phoenix, Fox News, etc.)

    p.s. I was the Janet that touched you, and sorry for claiming that you have a “titty” next time I’ll make sure to use the correct term, “breast.”

    k thanks bye.

  2. Meredith Meredith says:

    p.p.s. You write for the Weekly Dig, audience: hipsters.

  3. Sofia Green says:

    I’m very sorry you didn’t enjoy our show. I can assure you that on a normal night it’s not as “nostalgic” or “inside” as it seemed to you, but it is after all the end of an era, and one can’t help but look back on that era with a sense of nostalgia and love for the community which we have built among ourselves. If nothing else, our cast prides itself on being a haven for those who don’t feel at home elsewhere, and we are the very last group of people who would want to make someone else feel like an outsider.

    That being said, it is an honor to have one’s titty grabbed by our lovely Janet. I hope someday you come to appreciate the gift bestowed unto you.

  4. anon anon says:

    FBC does seem like a more private cast, but they do mingle with people in line, they don’t just stand away from everyone whilst smoking. They do warn everyone that groping happens in the aisle seats, they have been doing the same spiel with the rules and what happens for years. It should be assumed that you’re going to get touched because a huge part of the show is audience participation.

    The members are not all kids. Some of them are older. Some of them have been performing since the 80′s when shadow casting of Rocky Horror started.

    It doesn’t matter how many callbacks you know, its not a competition. Nobody thinks that they’re better than you because they’ve gone a few more times than you. You learn callbacks as you go and make your own. Its about being somewhere where you can let loose and be yourself, get a little crazy.

  5. Congratulations! You’ve attended a show where the theme of the film is “Give yourself over to absolute pleasure!” What was your research like before you went to this show as a journalist, clearly it was extensive. How does it feel to be the frigid bitch of the Weekly Dig, by the way which is one of the most liberal papers in Boston, that is FREE!

    You’ve come to an INTERACTIVE show where people pay to be groped, embarrassed, offended, and amused (with an R rating) by cast and other audience members. Though the FBC doesn’t intend to hurt anyone, we do put disclaimers frequently out there. We also announce to audience members that we are similar to a high class strip joint “we are allowed to touch you, you are not allowed to touch us!” We also like to point out that aisle seats are the “fun” seats, meaning: you will get touched. Also, if you come in the “appropriate” attire, which means women scantily dressed in nipple tape, and men in fishnets, and you’re on the aisle seat, you now have a guarantee of getting touched (it seems like you were falsely identified). Sorry we are not like the wholesome broadway show you thought we were, but please keep in mind the audience we attract.

    So sorry you had someone touch you sexually, and that it was a woman, which you clearly seem to not enjoy, but once again, the theme of the film clearly leans towards a more bisexual point of view, that is INTERACTIVE, and ONCE AGAIN with an R RATING!

    You came to the show clearly with a closed mind, and no previous information (which you can easily look up from past articles like the Globe that is reputable, our security team that announces exactly what to except and when, as well as past images & videos – so you can actually see what we do). Also, we make it very clear that we are always open to talk to any reporters with given notice or introducing yourself as press (please seek references with The Globe, The Boston Herald, The Crimson, The Phoenix, Fox News, etc.)

    p.s. I was the Janet that touched you, and sorry for claiming that you have a “titty” next time I’ll make sure to use the correct term, “breast.”

    k thanks bye.

    p.p.s. You write for the Weekly Dig, audience: hipsters.

  6. J J says:

    Terrible report. I’ve been there twice and both times it was an amazing event, regardless of my inexperience. Perhaps dig should have sent a non-prudish and not pretentious ‘journalist’. Her commentary just seems like she’s jealous no one thinks she is awesome for being a ‘journalist’ at an event not about her.

  7. Crystal Crystal says:

    I am sorry your experience was not what you were hoping for. I performed as Janet with FBC for 7 years and was part of the cast for over 10 and will be performing at one of the last shows this weekend. I always remember us being very welcoming to new people and always trying to make everyone feel a part of the show (after all this group has become my family here in MA as I did not grow up here). I do hope you give us another chance to prove that we want to welcome and entertain, not just impress everyone by seeing our show again once we move to Boston.
    Thank you though for your honest input. We can not improve without criticism, so knowing what we need to work on helps a lot.
    Crys

  8. Ron Ron says:

    I’m sorry for your bad experience, but I know three lovely girls (my two friends who work at the show and my girlfriend) who love the show to death. I totally agree you shouldn’t have been groped if you did not want to be. I do however think it’s unfair to write a rant and attack everyone that even went to the show. My point is, if you are mad at the actress that played Janet go write an article about her. If you’re mad at the door man go write an article about how AMC door men are jerks, because as an employee of AMC, The door man should not be a reflection on the full body cast. Lastly, the people outside? I too would be a little weirded out if someone approached my girlfriend and I on the streets of Cambridge at midnight and wanted to take pictures of us… It appears that those three bad experiences led you to the conclusion that The Full Body Cast and anyone who enjoys the production are “a bunch of fucking hipsters”, and only one of those experiences even relates to the Full Body Cast. I’m sorry you apparently had zero fun at the show and if that is the case, you truly are alone. The next time you are aggravated with an injustice, write about that, instead of bad-mouthing my girlfriend and my friends.

  9. Hi!
    I am very sorry to hear that your experience at the Rocky show you went to was less that you hoped for. I have been with the Full Body Cast for 11 years and this the first time I have read an article about the cast and the experience as a whole portrayed in a negative light. After reading your article a couple of times it seems to me that you may have been a little more focused on the fact that you showed up as a reporter and weren’t treated like royalty instead of writing a well thought out and well written article about the cast, the show and the experience that the audience had.

    I saw you there that evening while I waiting with the rest of the cast and crew to get into the theater. I made eye contact and smiled at you. You turned away from me and continued to stay outside of the group. This isn’t generally how a reporter gets a story but I could be wrong never having taken journalism in college. I also read that you couldn’t get any pictures which I find funny since you had a camera which means you had the ability all evening to shoot photos to your heart’s content even if it had to be outside of the theater before you were let in. No one from the Full Body Cast is ever going to tell you “No, don’t take my picture.” We like that sort of thing.

    I hope you come back after we return in August in our new theater. I hope your first experience at Rocky doesn’t leave such a bad taste in your mouth that you wouldn’t try to have a little fun and give it another shot. Maybe come with a group of friends, leave the camera and notebook at home, and show up with a positive attitude next time. I promise you’ll enjoy yourself.

  10. >:-( >:-( says:

    If you are supposed be a journalist, then be one. I saw you walking around near the cast across the street from the theater. Hell, you walked by me several times and you never once said a word. Your job as a “journalist” is to talk to people, which means go up and talk to them. It is not our job to hunt you down just because you have a camera on your shoulder.

    Also, a “journalist” does research before going into something s/he hasn’t encountered before. Don’t go into something with a preconceived notion of what is going to happen instead of knowing what will happen first.

    You went to the show to write an article about the last shows in Harvard Square. I don’t see any of that here. All I see in a whiny little girl who found out someone pissed in her Cheerios.

  11. suzanne bixby suzanne bixby says:

    Something tells me (oh yeah, the reply rants) that this article hit a nerve, but only with the people in, or closely connected to the show. Everything they write – despite their protestations to the contrary, point to this happening only being understood and appreciated by insiders, and if you’re a slightly bewildered “newbie” trying to find your way and “feel out” the experience before you’re “felt up,” then you’re neither welcomed nor embraced.

    I have to side with the journalist. The RHPS must be daunting the first time and I’ll spitball and say that the people who put it on night after night might think they’re clear as day in their efforts to make the attendees beware, but step outside yourselves every so often and pretend its your first time (hey, you’re actors, should be easy). Maybe you’ll get a different perspective on just how nuts the show is and be more helpful and less pissy when someone dares to crticize. “Oh how dare she belittle our Preciiiioooouuusss!”

    Just because something has been a so-called institution for years doesn’t mean it is immune from critique, and as many a mama has said, “first impressions are the most important.”

    And speaking of research and titties, perhaps the actress who did the titty grab and the “how dare she not like it she must be frigid” soapbox diatribe should research the journalist as a person and she how involved and supportive she is for the LGBT community. She doesn’t care who touches her lady bits as long as its been okayed (although maybe the actress is giving herself way too much credit as a first class titty toucher). Hell, even airlines make sure you know when you’re in an evacuation row and give you the optio to switch. Then, that actor should issue two apologies. One on behalf of the theater company for assuming its policies and activities were crystal clear to first-time attendees (an unfortunate case of head up ass syndrome from over familiarity with ones one activities) and then apologize for herself and her fellow actors for being indifferent and “too cool for school” to the Dig reporter on the scene, but then turning around and seeming to care about what she wrote afterward. Can’t have it both ways, hipsters. What you do last night is reflected in the hard light day in the Dig tomorrow. Sometimes by a prude in hipsters clothing.

  12. Trent Stewart Trent Stewart says:

    Please know that the retarded rant of one childish over-indulged member of the cast does not speak for the entire show as a whole. I have been involved with the F.B.C. for over ten years and for the most part, audience’s personal space is respected. We do indeed push the boundaries but with consent.

    I, for one would flip if anyone grabbed my wife without her permission and I know for a fact that if that particular Janet declared that she was molested, not only would her fiancee take action, but the security would throw the culprit out.

    Our director takes these things very seriously and I assure you he will be looking into this further. Our goal is to provide enjoyment and expand our cult-audience fan base. I am sorry that your experience didn’t meet expectation. I personally offer my apology.

    Sincerely,
    Trent (F. B.C. member since 2002)

  13. otasorednad otasorednad says:

    emily,

    just shut the fuck up.
    you almost sounded like you knew what you were talking about.

  14. Julie Julie says:

    I’m bothered by the thought that anyone would read this article and take what you said about the show at face value.

    If you are some sort of amateur journalist, you’ve got a lot to learn. Journalism is about being, well, kind of a pain in the ass. You need to walk in, introduce yourself, tell people what you want, get your information and photos, and then leave and construct your story. You can’t hang around the periphery like the new girl in town at a middle school dance waiting for someone to walk up to you, introduce themselves, and then take you to the person who would most be able to help you– which is a totally unnatural situation, by the way, but the FBC cast was kind enough to do that anyways because they’re very professional and know how to handle themselves with the press (go ahead and do a google search on past articles that have been written about them; you’ll find your opinion in the minority).

    You should have gone in with a very different attitude. Instead,you constructed for yourself a miserable experience in which you were the outsider (journalists need a little more backbone in this department, m’dear) and as a result, you felt awkward and uncomfortable all night. No wonder you didn’t have any fun! You didn’t even leave it open as an option. My guess is you’re not the sort of person who has fun going places alone anyways. You should have brought a friend or two.

    I’m not a cast member, nor have I ever been. I met my husband at the show, though, and I can count many cast & crew members among my closest friends– some were even in my wedding, which was overwhelmingly attended by family. You went to the FBC’s family reunion, which brought out of the shadows people who were cast members SO LONG AGO that they had a hard time proving they’d ever been cast members! (By the way, kudos– not irritation– is due to the AMC theatre employee who did his job well to protect his company’s liability and the cast & crew’s safety by screening early entrants. That’s a big part of his job, you know.) You can’t walk into that sort of environment and just sit around waiting for someone to walk up to you and hold your hand. Be a Big Girl Reporter and do your job better next time. The experience you had here is on you, not the show.

  15. Julie Julie says:

    Also– it seems from your distant vantage point you came up with an almost humorous mis-assessment of the FBC members. I would expect you to know a hipster when you see one. That actually had me laughing. I don’t think you met most of the cast if you pulled that one out!

  16. Violet Violet says:

    I have been performing with FBC for three years and going to see the show since I was around thirteen years old. I have never had a bad night down in Harvard square. It was one of the first places in my life that I felt accepted. So after what I’ve read I have to ask, if you were seeing the same show as every one else.
    I see I was not the only person offended by your article. And what nerve you must have for attacking our all inclusive theater group in our time of nostalgia and grief. In losing that theater we all feel like we are losing a friend. Friendship is a big thing at the FBC, and if you hadn’t come in with such a shamefully closed mind you would have seen that. I think perhaps you need to spend another year in school if you are calling the “Kids” of the FBC and I quote “fucking Hipsters”. I thought your article was poorly written and offensive, and sister I know all about offensive.
    Sometime when you have grown up a little more you should come back to Rocky with an open mind at our new location.
    -Violet

  17. Linda B says:

    For someone that’s supposedly a “journalist,” I wouldn’t have known by this article. All I see here is a whiny little girl who found out someone pissed in her Cheerios.

    I did see you last weekend, pacing back and forth, camera on your shoulder, but didn’t go up to any one in the cast that I saw. You walked by me several times and didn’t say anything. Part of being a journalist is having the ability to just go up to anyone, not sulking around waiting for us to go to you.

    Another thing that is part of being a journalist is doing your research before going on an assignment.

  18. Shaniqua Shaniqua says:

    I am so sorry your experience did not mirror that of the many people who have returned to see the FBC perform week after week for 28 years. I would however like to submit a defense of what was my second family for a couple glorious years. The people in that cast are some of the most loyal and trustworthy people I have ever known, and now that I live on the opposite coast I miss them regularly. They give the show their free time and their funds. It’s an environment that may not be for everyone, but for me it was a means of coming out as a freak and finding others likeminded.

  19. Pat Pat says:

    I’m sorry to hear that you did not have a good time at the show. We always try to provide a great time for the entire audience (virgins, long-time audience members, and everyone in between), but a lot of the things you seemed upset about are part of the Rocky Horror experience. Most of the cast gets together only once a week, so while we don’t intend to be unapproachable before the show (though we do get weirded out when someone starts snapping photos of us without permission), we do like to spend time with our friends before the insanity of the show starts (plus, we try to keep the chain smokers away from the audience line). I would also say that the show is something best enjoyed with friends. This is an interactive event and it has been my experience that people who come in groups have a better time than people who come alone (enjoy the free sexual double entendre).

    The theater is also a completely separate entity than the cast. AMC has specific rules about the media, and especially about the possibility of people photographing or filming copy-written material. The audience, media, and especially the cast need to respect those rules since we are there only as long as AMC wants us there. Many an Emerson journalism major (seriously, like five or six a year) has been turned away because they just showed up without any prior notification.

    I also apologize for the undesired physical contact you received. I don’t know if you were let in before the security speech to the audience, but it is usually very specific about the “we touch you, but you don’t touch us” and the “special aisle seat” aspects of the show.

    By the way, I was the cast member who found you in line and introduced you to our director.

  20. ashley ashley says:

    viva la fbc. fuck this article.

  21. Ms. Hopkins,

    I have read your review on Harvard Square’s weekly showing of Rocky Horror Picture Show and after analyzing your shock-gossip writing style, I would suggest you leave your journalism ethic away from the papers. I think a more appropriate source for your inside scoop reporting might be a yelp restaurant review blog.

    Something that surprised me in this article was your contradicting statements between who you were as a person and what you experienced. You wrote, “I was in plays in high school,” and “Rocky Horror is a colorful show, but the cast and crew were all dressed in black as they sucked on their cigarettes outside the Christian Science Reading Room, across from the theater.” Since you were in plays, it should not take a Nancy Drew thought process to understand crewmembers wear black. They wear black so that when changing sets, distracting colors are not apparent and so that audience members know who is working security. You write, “I even remember printing out a copy of the anti-script (the stuff Rocky Horror fans shout at the screen during the show) so that I could yell at my TV screen,” and “it’s a little hard to hear anything clearly; everyone in the audience is shouting their own version of the anti-script, and the result is what sounds like a busy bar.” So, is it that you have respect for the anti-script as a general concept but it’s annoying when an audience is applying it? Should we hire Keith Lockhart to cue the audience turning the anti-script into a well organized symphony? You highlight both, “while completely acknowledging the fact that I might be a party pooper, I am totally put off by its plastic sheen and vapidity,” when discussing a dance themed pre-show and “I can hardly hear as I fight back that lump that forms in the back of your throat right before you cry,” when discussing an incident of getting your breast squeezed by a cast member. One is too fake for you and the other too real. What is it exactly that you are looking for?

    These contradictions are fun, but I think my favorite part of your article is that you complained because an AMC “lacky” was mad because you were unprofessional. The AMC employee (who, by the way) might be losing his job soon, was being an “ass-hole” because you made an impromptu decision to take a bunch of potentially publishable pictures. One person in this situation is doing his job and the other isn’t. Do you know which one isn’t, Ms. Hopkins?

    “I wanted to be part of the Harvard Square Rocky Horror experience, but it’s just not mine to have…” I couldn’t have put it better myself. It’s just not yours to have. You obviously came in ready to slam us for whatever vendetta you hold. There was no way you were going to be pleased because you already knew you weren’t going to be.

    This article is a joke. You’re a joke. And don’t fucking call my friends and I hipsters.

    - David Jubinsky

  22. I’m sorry you didn’t enjoy the show, but if you’re going to present yourself as a journalist, have the courtesy to act like one: professionalism, do your research, be willing to whore yourself out for that Pulitzer prize winning story.

    Perhaps if you had kept your personal bias off the street, and away from the blog ‘post’ button, you’d have had a better experience. The cast and crew were in the middle of a chaotic time of reunion, loss and exhausting rehearsal, all for a show that lived and thrived in Harvard Square for 28 years– weekly– for no pay, all the while warning the daylights out of our audiences that there is language, sex, violence, and yes, gasp, audience interaction. We tell you where to go if you don’t want to be touched. We tell you no pictures because the movie is copyrighted; we have permission to show it, but you do not have permission to photograph it, nor can we or the AMC corporation transfer those rights to you. Did you miss those rules? Why did you not take the impetus to start talking to anyone and everyone who would give you two words to understand them? You show no empathy, no appreciation of the work involved, no willingness to admit you could be taking it all the wrong way in the name of reader sympathy. Do you think Walter Cronkite liked investigating the Tet Offensive? No. He kept his opinions to himself, he brought the public a story, and he was rewarded for it.

    But you’re just going to continue to paint yourself the victim. I feel sorry for your next target, because they may not have so many people willing to speak up, and tell the other side of the story. We’re moving on, and we’re going to continue to perform for audiences of many ages and persuasions, and help keep a cultural phenomenon alive in Boston. I hope you can find a way to ditch your ‘oh woe is me’ act and see us again with an open mind, then write it up with the professional pen instead of the poisoned one. If not, the show will go on without you.

    Hipsters? Talk about a shallow, continually re-defined, and much abused label. Beatniks? Maybe. Misanthropes? Maybe. Theater folk? Yes. Mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, daughters, sons, lovers, spouses, friends and soulmates united under a common interest? Yes, oh yes.

  23. Gia Gia says:

    I usually pride the Dig on their honest, candid articles. This one, however, strikes me as more of an attention-seeking tirade than anything.

    The Full Body Cast makes it explicitly clear, with multiple verbal warnings as well as an on-screen warning before the show, that this is a highly sexualized and highly interactive show and that if that isn’t your cup of tea, it’s not the place for you. Essentially all RHPS shadowcasts across the country are INTENTIONALLY DEBAUCHEROUS – that’s the point of the film! It is disappointing to see that, as a self-proclaimed journalist, you failed to do some prior research on the event before you went because this is how these shows go everywhere. People come dressed in lingerie and run around with nipple tape on their boobs! And yeah, everyone’s shouting because that’s what they do in these shows. If you didn’t like it then you should’ve left.

    As for the groping incident, I find it highly inappropriate that you would even use a word usually reserved for sexual predators to describe what happened. Nobody singled you out because you’re sexy or hot or a woman, so to describe the incident as if it were practically rape is really unfair to the FBC.

    As for the AMC doorman who was trying to follow the rules and keep his job, you should have put your so-called journalism skills to use and write to AMC about it instead of projecting further negativity on the FBC who had nothing to do with it.

    This article is like being upset over receiving a lapdance at a strip club – you ask for it by walking in the door. Don’t go to an event that advertises itself as such and then whine about it afterwards. And do everyone a favor and do a little research before you make a fool of yourself by writing an article in this manner.

  24. John John says:

    Hey guys! This girl was upset by a bunch of shit and felt somewhat violated by being groped! Let’s attack her! YAYY! Seriously, fuck you! And for all the people who are pissed about being called “hipsters” you all respond in the typical hipster way! So defensive, so exclusive, so bullshit. Many of you use the word “inclusive” while you’re telling her to essentially “get the fuck out of our exclusive little club” in the same breath. You dudes are so welcoming! People who have never seen the show before will totally go to it after they read your fucking tantrum rants!! Get a life.

  25. HILARY HUGHES HILARY HUGHES says:

    To read these comments does nothing but prove Emily’s points. For those of you bashing our “journalistic” integrity because we published an unfavorable review of your production: you’re literally doing exactly what Emily supposedly did that offended you and your “artistic” integrity so very much. To the T. She went to your show and wrote a blog post about what she saw. She owns her opinions 100% and wrote about THE EXPERIENCE OF GOING TO A ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW PERFORMANCE.

    For those of you with concerns – legitimate ones – feel free to email the Music + Arts Editor of this alternative weekly, AKA Me, at hilary@digpublishing.com and we’ll discuss this in a professional matter. Otherwise, I highly recommend you refrain from eviscerating a contributor because it does absolutely nothing but bring YOU down and perpetuate one of the main points of Emily’s article: that you’re not interested in making this event and experience open to other people.

  26. FUCK YEAH HFH!!!!

  27. CARLI VELOCCI CARLI VELOCCI says:

    Hillary said it better than I or anybody else could

    I understand people getting offended by the article, but Emily even prefaces this with the fact that this was her own experience, from her point of view, and what she saw. She is not writing from an unbiased standpoint, and if she was, you would have known. This is an opinion piece about her experience, and reflects differently than what a review would.

    You’re allowed to be offended by her comments, because I know how protective people are in the Full Body Cast, but do not diss her journalistic integrity because she wanted to be honest, and she said so.

  28. HILARY HUGHES HILARY HUGHES says:

    Oh, and I’d like to bring up the very obvious fact that if Meredith Wish were a dude and behaved as appallingly as she did/is in the wake of hearing that she made someone uncomfortable? That person’s departure from the cast would happen SO FAST your sequined top hats and aprons would spin.

    Don’t let the fact that Meredith Wish is a girl or a member of this cast dilute this TOTALLY RIDICULOUS AND EMBARRASSING REACTION TO A NEGATIVE BLOG POST. Seriously, Meredith, you’re now the girl who’s name is gonna be attached to grabbing someone inappropriately, defending it and then harassing them for voicing their discomfort.

  29. HILARY HUGHES HILARY HUGHES says:

    And Meredith? It’s DigBoston. For someone so up on PROTECTING THE SANCTITY OF JOURNALISTIC INTEGRITY IN THE NAME OF METICULOUS RESEARCH this alt-weekly changed its damn name over a year ago.

  30. What is this? Ms Hughes, why is digboston publishing a review that’s primary focus is to judge a cast’s hospitality when it should be criticizing the performance? There is one vague comment about how fake a pre show was. The comments in this article are rude and have no foundation. It would be like me saying, “the people at the boston dig…what a bunch of judgmental pricks.”

  31. HILARY HUGHES HILARY HUGHES says:

    “Things go better once the show starts—it’s as hilarious as I thought it would be, and I was put in a laughing fit by the rice that rained down during Brad and Janet’s proposal scene. It’s a little hard to hear anything clearly; everyone in the audience is shouting their own version of the anti-script, and the result is what sounds like a busy bar. A few clear sentences ring through every now and then (most notably from Wally’s guest, whose shouts are by far the funniest), but mostly it’s just sonic sludge, and I can’t decide if it’s the seasoned veterans or the shouts of “virgins” who have mistaken the tradition for casual heckling.

    The show is still fun though, and it has energy, but my mental displacement is complete when the cast member playing Janet grabs my right breast as she runs down the aisle, vulgarly shouting, “Titty!” as she takes a squeeze.”

    That’s her assessment of her surroundings and brings up a very real downside to attending any screening of the Rocky Horror Picture Show: that its die-hard fans and newcomers alike at times get carried away with the call-backs, and that this can be obnoxious and distracting for those coming to the show for the first time. The truth may hurt, buddy, but it’s not harping on the “hospitality” of the cast, though I’m sure that’d help validate the slew of comments published above, albeit barely. To say Emily’s comments have “no foundation” is to call her a liar. Seeing as FBC’s comments above corroborated her statements, I’d rethink your approach.

  32. Bernard K Rosenschmidt Bernard K Rosenschmidt says:

    Imagine being locked in a theater with four hundred Tourette’s-suffering autists, compulsively screaming retorts after every line in the script robotically, slapping each other on the back in smarmy satisfaction for their mastery of a cult classic.

    Was it edgy?

    No.

    What was it?

    Obnoxious comes to mind; Over, maybe. Rocky Horror Picture Show is obsolete. At least, that’s what I observed when I attended the last showing. Like with the adherents of the Church of Scientology, the RHPS true-believers are those who’ve invested too many resources to admit that they’re chasing yesterday’s cool. Sorry.

    Emily, I am in total agreement with your assessment.