Arts 

PREVIEW: CYBERARTS

Pathways-Birdwatching_Arar-1


(Pathways (Birdwatching) by Raphael Arar)

“Technology is integral to humanity, we evolved along with it,”

said artist Alexander Reben last week at the newly formed Boston CyberArts gallery in Jamaica Plain’s Green Street MBTA station.

Reben’s talk was intended to analyze the relationship we have with modern technology, discussing the personal intimacy we feel toward the tools we use daily. Citing his own work, Reben referenced a performance-based piece he created that would auto-send the text message, “I don’t like you anymore,” to randomly chosen contacts. This begs an important question:

Is technology building uncontrollable extensions of our own identities, and if so, how did this evolution happen?

(Pulse Machine / Alicia Eggert in collaboration with Alexander Ruben)

The gallery, co-directed by multimedia curator George Fifield, aims to bring questions like this to the public through several educational programs, panels, and exhibitions. CyberArts’ first show, COLLISION18: Present, is organized by MIT-based COLLISIONcollective, and explores the concept of the “eternal present” within the digital landscape—like forever-looping videos and work made from QR codes—leading us into cryptic, strange territories.

(Stuxnet by Data|Space|Time)

“CyberArt encompasses any artistic endeavor in which computer technology is used to expand artistic possibilities,” said Fifield. “In the same way that paint, photographic film, musical instruments, and other materials have always been used to express an artist’s vision.”

So don’t worry about those hurtful text messages you got the morning after. They probably still like you.

COLLISION18:PRESENT OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY 11.9.12
BOSTON CYBERARTS GALLERY
141 GREEN ST.
JAMAICA PLAIN
6PM/ALL AGES/FREE
@BOSTONCYBERARTS
BOSTONCYBERARTS.ORG.


'

Comments are closed.