Film 

IN THE TUBES: HOW TO BE ALONE

how to be alone

Make way for some sappy poetry and shit.

From the classroom, to the workplace, to the barstool, being extroverted is being rich in social currency and can often mean getting that A, that promotion, or that extra drink on the house.

I knew I was introverted before I took Susan Cain’s test from her book, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking, so I wasn’t surprised that I scored pretty high (16/20).

I have no problems being an introvert, because it’s really easy for me to be alone, but I can sometimes feel insulted or self-conscious in a culture that values its extroverts over its introverts.

After a day of phone-answering, email-sending, Tweeting, Tumbling and all around Hootsuiting, I kind of want to shoot my computer and throw out my phone like I just made a drug deal.

French philosopher Jacques Ellul said that humans are slaves to technology, that instead of controlling it, “human beings have to adapt to it, and accept total change.” And even though I enjoy all the communication that is literally AT MY FINGERTIPS, when the day is over, I like to be reminded that I’m not crazy for wanting shut all that out.

Which is why I want to present to you:  ”How to Be Alone”, a poem written and performed by Tanya Davis, filmed and animated by Andrea Dorfman.  I think I’m going to start watching this everyday at 5:01 p.m.

Oh, the sweet rapture of being alone, and not lonely.  Of not wanting, needing, company.

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One Response to IN THE TUBES: HOW TO BE ALONE

  1. CARLI VELOCCI CARLI VELOCCI says:

    I’ve been watching this for the past three years, just to remind me that things aren’t too bad.