Film 

OUTSIDE THE CABLE BOX: HOUSE OF CARDS

house-of-cards

Give me some Kevin Spacey!

SPOILER ALERT!!!

Okay, so I will admit, I developed a little crush on Kevin Spacey the first time I watched American Beauty. Kind of creepy I know and no I do not have Daddy issues but maybe just a thing for older men who daydream about rose petals and naked girls…who are Kevin Spacey

Anyway, upon opening my email last Friday, I quickly browsed through the junk until I happened upon a message from Netflix (I recently lost a DVD from them and my conscience thought that somehow knew) and was intrigued to see Kevin Spacey sitting in the Lincoln Memorial with blood running from his hands onto the pure white marble advertising the new Netflix original series House of Cards. Right away I knew this show was going to be sassy.

The opening episode makes a dark first impression as Francis Underwood (Kevin Spacey), a Congressman in D.C., smothers a dog that had just been injured in a hit-and-run accident. “There are two kinds of pain; the sort of pain that makes you strong or useless pain. I have no patience for useless things,” he says as he stares straight into the camera. Only a small preview inside just how inequitable this series gets.

Political dramas aren’t something that I typically lean towards, I usually enjoy shows about drunken Italians getting arrested and 16 year olds with babies, so watching a show like House of Cards was new for me. I was sucked in. I didn’t even have a chance.

House of Cards exposes just how dirty politics can become. Francis Underwood’s primary goal is to become Vice President and every move he makes is carefully pre-constructed and calculated to benefit his long-term objective. He does this by discreetly teaming up with a young reporter Zoe Barnes, Kate Mara from American Horror Story (meow!), who works for the Washington Herald newspaper. They profit from each other, as Francis is able to leak certain information to deter and harm the people in his way while Zoe uses him to progress her career as a journalist. Together they become a ruthless and deathly powerhouse controlling every move made on “the hill”, at Underwood’s discretion of course.

You’re constantly on the edge of your seat thinking, “Is he really going to do that? Wait, did he really just do that?” I thought Breaking Bad was a mind-fuck but House of Cards steals the show in just one season. Underwood goes as far as to kill someone to make room for his seat and plays favors for people only to manipulate and blackmail them in order to get what he wants. Even his wife Claire, played by Robin Wright (Jennnayyyy from Forrest Gump), gets dirty by sabotaging one of his campaigns. It quickly becomes clear that they will stop at nothing to get to the top.

The show is directed and produced by a slew of well known industry names such as David Fincher (The Social Network), James Foley (Glengarry GenRoss), Joel Schumacher (Batman & Robin), Charles McDougall (The Office) Carl Franklin (Out of Time), Alan Coulter (Boardwalk Empire), Dana Brunetti (The Social Network) and even Kevin Spacey himself, and is also written by Beau Willimon (The Ides of March) and Eric Roth (Forrest Gump).

Netflix released all 13 hour-long episodes of season one together on February 1st,, with a second season in the wakes, giving the audience the decision of when, where and how much to watch. I decided to binge the entire season into three days, which isn’t abnormal for me.

We all either have our own Netflix subscriptions or know someone willing to share, so grab some popcorn, make a blanket fort and become a hermit for 13 hours to watch House of Cards, even if you’re not a political buff. Trust me, it’s worth the lack of a social life.

About JESSICA MOLL

Jessica is from a small town in the boonies and is proud to exclaim that she can name a bird just by its call. For now, she resides in Allston where the only calls identified are belligerent adolescents and ferocious rats.
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