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REPORTING LIVE: 2013 NEWPORT FOLK FESTIVAL: DAY 2

More dispatches from Day 2 of the 2013 Newport Folk trenches. And by “trenches” we mean “cushy backstage with free beer.” Tough life. 

We were lucky enough to enter the festival as Langhorne Slim started, with his rowdy rock and bluesy voice. It was an exciting way to start Saturday.

 

He was great but I had to flee immediately because in the Paste Ruins there was an intimate, headphone-loaded set by the Milk Carton Kids.

Their sound really worked from inside a cave.

Lone Bellow played the Quad Stage next, and were part of a very long lineup of really great up-and-comers that would play that particular stage for all of Saturday.

They were also the first band I’d heard so far that were getting the crowd going during their sound check. Everybody was pretty warmed up when they actually started playing. They’re one of those Newport bands that gets a lot of hype surrounding them before they even take the stage, which can typically make or break a band, but they had that amazing thing happen where halfway through their set, word gets out about how lively and strong it is and by that halfway point, their audience had spilled out well beyond what the Quad Stage usually fits.

This band was working their ass off to ensure the crow had a good time, and the crowd responded in kind.

At one point they broke into a sing-along of the Goo Goo Dolls Edwin McCain [oops. -ed.] song “I’ll Be,” but I won’t hold it against them.

Back to the Paste Ruins for another intimate set, this time with our homies of Kingsley Flood. Later on they admitted that there was some noise bleed from the Quad Stage that made it hard to hear themselves, but as a member of the crowd wearing the specifically designated headphones for that stage, I didn’t hear them miss a beat. They opened with the lovely “Sigh Awhile” … anything with chimes makes me happy.

Houndmouth was over at the Harbor Stage by this point, and I was lucky enough to catch their rendition of Bob Dylan’s “I Shall Be Released,” for which they were joined onstage by Dawes’ Taylor Goldsmith.

Frank Turner played the main Fort Stage, and had the least folk and yet most badass show of the day. A gigantic crowd turned out for his loud, foul-mouthed, and gnarly set.

“We’re a bit more raucous than some of the people playing here today,” Turner said after his opening track. “But I think we’re gonna have fun.”


Both of those things were true. From there, he launched into the track “Losing Days.”

I wanted to stay at Frank Turner longer because I’ve told you guys about my propensity for moshing and I felt that one may have been imminent, but I also positively had to go catch Shovels & Rope, another one of those much-hyped bands. This one consisted of a guy-girl couple who, between the two of them, played about 45 instruments simultaneously. More specifically, Cary Anne Hearst played the kick drum and sang, while Michael Trent played acoustic guitar, harmonica, and sang.

And interestingly enough, their harmonies were one of the most noteworthy things about them. Anyway, they were pure folk although they kept adorably differentiating the genres of their songs: “Just because it’s a folk festival doesn’t mean we can’t play rock and roll, right?” he asked the crowd.

Applause, obviously.

They were only a duo, but they made a fucking racket.

Iris Dement went on shortly thereafter at the Harbor Stage. She’s no stranger to the Newport Folk stage, and her gorgeous harmonies and simplistic instrumentation was a real treat after so many harder-edged bands on the lineup before her.

Then, the act I’d been waiting for, Father John Misty, came on at the Quad Stage. Many a lady at Newport Folk this year thought he was an absolute heartthrob and many a shrill “wooooo!” could be heard in support of his onstage antics.

 

The one-time member of Fleet Foxes started his set with the phrase,

“Let the satanic Norwegian death metal commence,” but if you think his proselytizing stopped there you’d be sorely mistaken.


During “Funtimes in Babylon,” he took a brief instrumental break to wax poetic on the sorry state of folk music, explaining that if a musician plays an acoustic instrument and “wear[s] a vest” then they have “an obligation to the music you claim to make.” He then said, somewhat shockingly but to much applause,

“I just got invited here because I’m white and I have a beard and there’s some acoustic guitar on my album.” Wowza.

Still, his voice was soulful and his set was so energetic–and enigmatic–that it kind of buzzed throughout the entire festival. He played a lot off the fantastic [Fear Fun], which is an album that you should hear immediately if you haven’t already done so. He also purportedly stole some girl’s cell phone when he bum rushed the crowd.

Colin Meloy‘s solo show also had a surprise performance from some members of Black Praire. My favorite track he played was “The Crane Wife Pt. 3,” because with just him onstage it had an earnestness and a sweetness that really brought out the material.

And then the night ended with the Avett Brothers, who played a less frenetic set than I’m used to from them, but who still created a gigantic dance party in the center aisle.

 

Naturally, I left the second day of Newport Folk as I always do: wishing that it went all night.

FOR NEWPORT FOLK DAY 1, CLICK HERE.

FOR MORE NEWPORT FOLK FESTIVAL COVERAGE, CHECK BACK ON DIGBOSTON.COM.




About CADY DRELL

Cady is the A+E Editor. You can send her an email at any time, as she gets separation anxiety when away from her phone longer than 30 seconds.
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4 Responses to REPORTING LIVE: 2013 NEWPORT FOLK FESTIVAL: DAY 2

  1. Pingback: REPORTING LIVE: 2013 NEWPORT FOLK FESTIVAL: DAY 3 | DigBoston

  2. hector hector says:

    correction: FJM’s album is called Fear Fun. less cool correction: Edwin McCain wrote “I’ll Be” and anybody who watched Dawson’s Creek as a kid should know that. maybe you were too young.

  3. CADY DRELL CADY DRELL says:

    noted and noted. there was a pretty lengthy discussion in the press tent about who sung the original “I’ll Be.” your expertise would have been appreciated/lovingly mocked.

  4. Pingback: KINGSLEY FLOOD'S DISPOSABLE CAMERAS @ NEWPORT FOLK FEST 2013 [PHOTOS] | DigBoston